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Yeneilyn Haim, RN


Yeneilyn is a Registered Nurse in the state of Florida since 2006. Her nursing practice began in the field of Cardiology at Mount Sinai Medical Hospital and expanded to care for clients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). She was provided the opportunity as LPN Instructor, which changed the course of her nursing career. She states, “Teaching nursing students expanded my view on positive influences nurses contribute beyond beside care. Nurses are central leaders in health education, client advocacy, and disease prevention.” Currently, Yeneilyn writes health articles and prepares Continuing Education (C.E.) courses for healthcare professionals. She continues her studies in the field of Nursing Education and evidenced-based nursing practice. In her free time she enjoys sharing time with family and friends.


For questions or topics of interest contact Nurse Yenny at: nurseyenny@gmail.com    


 


 


 

Although to date there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, drug therapies aim to improve memory and quality of life. There are two main drug classes: Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine. Each drug class influences different brain chemicals, and may be prescribed in tandem for optimal results. Medications do not cure Alzheimer’s disease, yet they help with disease management and general wellbeing.

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in Medicine 1831
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Contrary to popular belief, eight hours of sleep is not the sufficient amount of sleep everyone should be getting each night. According to the National Sleep Foundation recommended sleep times are influenced by the individual’s developmental age. The National Sleep Foundation also shares how our waking moods are highly influenced by what happens during our sleep. During sleep our body supports brain and physical health, as well as growth and development in children and teens.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH) comments on the importance of sleep stating, “Getting enough quality sleep at the right times can help protect your mental health, physical health, quality of life, and safety.” According to the NIH chronic sleep deprivation can raise the risk for certain health problems.

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in Wellness 1827
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Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic condition with no present cure, yet managing the disease process is essential for health and wellbeing. The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation recommends building a healthcare team, adhering to medications, keeping a healthy diet, finding support in groups and counseling, and others. Individuals with PD can also benefit from speech, physical, and occupational therapies. Specialized healthcare professionals and community resources can assist individuals with support and therapies that promote disease management and optimal daily living.

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in Health 1581
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Regardless of age, brain health is top priority when establishing a healthy lifestyle. Fortunately we can nourish our brain with nutritious food choices. WebMD comments on brain foods stating, “Add these 'superfoods' to your daily diet, and you will increase your odds of maintaining a healthy brain for the rest of your life.” Why wait any longer? Start fueling your body with power foods that support brain health!

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in Nutrition 3084
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Leap into spring as we welcome daylight savings time! Forwarding our clocks entails little efforts; yet transitioning to a new time schedule may require a period of adjustment. Can a change in time influence our work performance and other areas of life? We each have an internal clock known as the circadian rhythm that influences our sleep-wake cycle. Our circadian rhythm determines the time of the day when we are most alert and active, and times when we are more tired and sleepy. The National Institute of General Medical Services (NIGMS) notes, “Circadian rhythms can influence sleep-wake cycles, hormone release, body temperature and other important bodily functions. They have been linked to various sleep disorders, such as insomnia.” There are ways of adjusting to the change in time to prevent abrupt disturbances in our internal biological clocks. Below are some tips on how to transition our internal clocks as we spring into daylight savings time.

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in Wellness 1353
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